‘Commonwealth’ Written by Ann Patchett

“Commonwealth” (2016) is Ann Patchett’s seventh novel, but she facetiously calls it her “autobiographical first novel,” alluding to the debut novel a 20-something might write where it’s unabashedly stolen from her own life. If you’ve read other books by Patchett, you know the action can take place anywhere—in a jungle along the Amazon or at a nunnery in Kentucky. My favorite, “Bel Canto,” takes place in the home of a South American diplomat where several guerilla fighters hold his party-goers hostage for weeks. But since Patchett has fictionalized her own family life, it takes place in suburban homes in California and Virginia with two splintered families.

Patchett leads us into the action at a christening party one weekend afternoon in Southern California at the house of Fix Keating, a cop. Bert Cousins, an attorney known at the precinct, stops by brandishing a bottle of gin, looking for an excuse to get out of his house bustling with three toddlers and a pregnant wife. Bert takes one look at Fix’s wife, Beverly, and realizes, “This (is) the start of his life,” and that chemistry leads to the end of the two marriages. Fix stays in California, raising the baby Franny and toddler Caroline, while Bert and Beverly move to Virginia. Bert’s wife, Teresa, is left in California as the single mother of their four young ones—two boys and two girls.

Patchett made a daring choice, though, to tell the story of these two families in a non-chronological way. Readers may be jolted when the second chapter takes place several decades later when Franny, the beautiful baby her father, Fix, had carried around on that fateful day, is again with him as he undergoes chemotherapy. Each following chapter covers an episode in the lives of one of the 10 members of the families, but the scenes that sing with life involve the six kids spending summer vacations together in Virginia. “They did things, real things, and they never got caught.”

Looking back over it, I think of scenes that hadn’t moved the story along and were dropped as soon as they happened. A child dies from a bee sting because the kids had used the antidote he carried to quiet the hyperactive youngest sibling. The kids break into a car and steal a gun but do nothing with it. As an adult Franny has a relationship with a writer she had idolized, and he writes a novel based on her story. But it’s understandable. Life happens. And what you get with “Commonwealth” is a writer letting us in on all the highs and lows, tragedies and wonderful surprises of family life as she works at making sense of the life she’s lived and shares it with us.

Another beautifully written novel by Patchett that takes readers into perhaps more familiar territory.

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