‘Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine: A Novel’ Written by Gail Honeyman

Reader's Choice
When you pick up a book titled “Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine,” you know you are not getting another “Pride and Prejudice” or “The Sun Also Rises.” Yet, there is a quality about Gail Honeyman’s 2017 debut novel that left me certain that we will be hearing about this wonderful, one-of-a-kind book for a long time. I find myself wondering how to describe it to you. Should I put it in the category of a humor book (though it’s often dark), or an inspirational book, a psychological thriller, feel-good story, mystery or what? It happens to be all of the above.

Thirty-one-year-old Eleanor is a quintessential loner in Glasgow who works in the accounts department of a design firm. She finds her artsy colleagues childish and ignorant and makes no effort to hide it. (They find her eccentric and laughable.) She leads a life of unshakable routine—at her job by 8:30 a.m. each day, particular dinners for each evening in her apartment, then hours watching the tellie, usually with one or two bottles of vodka for company. The only change in her routine comes on Wednesday evenings when her mother calls from an unidentified place. Her foul-mouthed, cruel mother—“the pretty face of evil”—has been locked up somewhere for a crime that becomes clearer with time.

The energy of the story comes from what Eleanor tells us is the first day of the rest of her life. She won tickets in a charity raffle to the performance of a local band, and the moment the lead singer walked onto stage, Eleanor knew he was the one who was perfect for her, would please her mother, and turn her life in another direction. It’s clear to us that notion is ridiculous (we know him only through several of his tweets), but it starts Eleanor on a path of self-improvement. We see it begin when Raymond, a disheveled, young tech guy in the office fixes Eleanor’s computer and a friendship begins.

Honeyman quietly hints at the fact that the change in Eleanor’s life will be treated with some depth by dividing the book into three sections—Good Days, Bad Days, and Better Days. You see, Eleanor has a massive scar on her face, and Honeyman treats readers to a sensitively handled psychological exploration of the scars on Eleanor’s heart. Honeyman has written a heavy, but uplifting, human interest story with laugh-out-loud moments. It is one of the best books I’ve read in years.

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