Northwest Students’ Artwork Displayed at Strathmore

Northwest Students’ Artwork Displayed at Strathmore By Ethan Cadeaux On Thursday, June 16, eight Northwest High School students’ artwork was among 39 juried art installations unveiled along the new Grosvenor-Strathmore Arts Walk and on Strathmore’s campus. The 5-feet by 6-inch totems were created by advanced ceramics students in Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS). A panel composed of the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County, members of the local arts community, Strathmore, Metro, and MCPS selected the work of 14 schools after reviewing 82 proposals. Northwest’s team of eight students— Kylie Land, Slava Sokolovsky, Alexa Bowen, Cole Notari, Hannah Badger, Keval Patel, Jalen Magbie-Hunter and Erin Lee—spent months creating the totem. Northwest high school teacher Ellen Beck, who oversaw the project, said that her students had a vision for their totem, called “Dogtopia.” “Ours was designed to be realistic as opposed to abstract,” she explained, “and I think we did an excellent job representing our vision.” Beck asked her advanced ceramics students if they were interested in the project. When students decided to go ahead with it, they split up and worked on the totem project in place of typical class assignments. They spent months modeling, carving, painting, and getting the details right. Their attention to detail paid off with a totem that turned out to have such a high level of craftsmanship, Beck said. “The students divided up the work and each did portions that matched their skills and interests,” said Beck. “Some worked on sculpting the dog heads, some worked on rolling the clay slabs and forming the fire hydrant sections, and some were skilled at painting the dogs realistically.” Beck said that she is proud of her students. “We think ours is one of the best because it is technically well done, with a high level of craftsmanship, and also ours has a creative and humorous aspect that makes people smile,” she explained. “We gave the dogs names based on their personalities, and several of the dogs are actual dogs belonging to the students who worked on the totem.” Totems will stand for five years on Strathmore’s campus and along the green space and existing walkway at the Grosvenor-Strathmore Metro Parking Garage. “We wanted people who walk by to enjoy seeing the dogs of Northwest, and think of them as a friendly face—maybe even say ‘hi’ and give their favorite a pat,” said Beck. “That is what is fun and unique about sculptural art installations—you can plan for and even encourage the audience to interact with the artwork.”

Northwest Students’ Artwork Displayed at Strathmore
By Ethan Cadeaux
On Thursday, June 16, eight Northwest High School students’ artwork was among 39 juried art installations unveiled along the new Grosvenor-Strathmore Arts Walk and on Strathmore’s campus. The 5-feet by 6-inch totems were created by advanced ceramics students in Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS). A panel composed of the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County, members of the local arts community, Strathmore, Metro, and MCPS selected the work of 14 schools after reviewing 82 proposals.
Northwest’s team of eight students— Kylie Land, Slava Sokolovsky, Alexa Bowen, Cole Notari, Hannah Badger, Keval Patel, Jalen Magbie-Hunter and Erin Lee—spent months creating the totem. Northwest high school teacher Ellen Beck, who oversaw the project, said that her students had a vision for their totem, called “Dogtopia.” “Ours was designed to be realistic as opposed to abstract,” she explained, “and I think we did an excellent job representing our vision.”
Beck asked her advanced ceramics students if they were interested in the project. When students decided to go ahead with it, they split up and worked on the totem project in place of typical class assignments. They spent months modeling, carving, painting, and getting the details right. Their attention to detail paid off with a totem that turned out to have such a high level of craftsmanship, Beck said.
“The students divided up the work and each did portions that matched their skills and interests,” said Beck. “Some worked on sculpting the dog heads, some worked on rolling the clay slabs and forming the fire hydrant sections, and some were skilled at painting the dogs realistically.”
Beck said that she is proud of her students. “We think ours is one of the best because it is technically well done, with a high level of craftsmanship, and also ours has a creative and humorous aspect that makes people smile,” she explained. “We gave the dogs names based on their personalities, and several of the dogs are actual dogs belonging to the students who worked on the totem.”
Totems will stand for five years on Strathmore’s campus and along the green space and existing walkway at the Grosvenor-Strathmore Metro Parking Garage. “We wanted people who walk by to enjoy seeing the dogs of Northwest, and think of them as a friendly face—maybe even say ‘hi’ and give their favorite a pat,” said Beck. “That is what is fun and unique about sculptural art installations—you can plan for and even encourage the audience to interact with the artwork.”

Northwest Students’ Artwork Displayed at Strathmore

On Thursday, June 16, eight Northwest High School students’ artwork was among 39 juried art installations unveiled along the new Grosvenor-Strathmore Arts Walk and on Strathmore’s campus. The 5-feet by 6-inch totems were created by advanced ceramics students in Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS). A panel composed of the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County, members of the local arts community, Strathmore, Metro, and MCPS selected the work of 14 schools after reviewing 82 proposals.

Northwest’s team of eight students— Kylie Land, Slava Sokolovsky, Alexa Bowen, Cole Notari, Hannah Badger, Keval Patel, Jalen Magbie-Hunter and Erin Lee—spent months creating the totem. Northwest high school teacher Ellen Beck, who oversaw the project, said that her students had a vision for their totem, called “Dogtopia.” “Ours was designed to be realistic as opposed to abstract,” she explained, “and I think we did an excellent job representing our vision.”

Beck asked her advanced ceramics students if they were interested in the project. When students decided to go ahead with it, they split up and worked on the totem project in place of typical class assignments. They spent months modeling, carving, painting, and getting the details right. Their attention to detail paid off with a totem that turned out to have such a high level of craftsmanship, Beck said.

“The students divided up the work and each did portions that matched their skills and interests,” said Beck. “Some worked on sculpting the dog heads, some worked on rolling the clay slabs and forming the fire hydrant sections, and some were skilled at painting the dogs realistically.”

Beck said that she is proud of her students. “We think ours is one of the best because it is technically well done, with a high level of craftsmanship, and also ours has a creative and humorous aspect that makes people smile,” she explained. “We gave the dogs names based on their personalities, and several of the dogs are actual dogs belonging to the students who worked on the totem.”

Totems will stand for five years on Strathmore’s campus and along the green space and existing walkway at the Grosvenor-Strathmore Metro Parking Garage. “We wanted people who walk by to enjoy seeing the dogs of Northwest, and think of them as a friendly face—maybe even say ‘hi’ and give their favorite a pat,” said Beck. “That is what is fun and unique about sculptural art installations—you can plan for and even encourage the audience to interact with the artwork.”

Share