See Into Interior Spaces at the Arts Barn Gallery

Photo | Marylou Bono (L to R, top) Artists Howard Clark, Michael Townsend, Leesha Gray, Luc Fiedler, Linda Slattery-Sherman, Susan Delaney, Jeanine L. Cummins and (L to R, bottom)  Alexey Zoob, Vicky Surles, Harriet Wise and Andrea Kleinbussink spoke about their work at a Dec. 15 reception for the new “Interior Spaces” exhibit at the Arts Barn.

Photo | Marylou Bono
(L to R, top) Artists Howard Clark, Michael Townsend, Leesha Gray, Luc Fiedler, Linda Slattery-Sherman, Susan Delaney, Jeanine L. Cummins and (L to R, bottom) Alexey Zoob, Vicky Surles, Harriet Wise and Andrea Kleinbussink spoke about their work at a Dec. 15 reception for the new “Interior Spaces” exhibit at the Arts Barn.

Art can only truly be art by presenting an adequate outward symbol of some fact in the interior life. So posited Margaret Fuller, an early 19th century American journalist and women’s rights advocate. Her words came to life Dec. 15 at the Arts Barn Gallery’s artists’ reception for “Interior Spaces,” which asked viewers, “Are interior spaces confined to buildings or are they a glimpse down an alleyway, inside the mind’s eye or down a rabbit hole?” Each of the 20 artists interpreted this question in their own unique way.

Frederick-based photographer Harriet Wise, founder of the TAG Gallery and Frederick Camera Clique, started out as a printmaker. “Someone showed me how to work in the darkroom,” she said, “and I said, ‘I’m done with printmaking!’” Her three photos, “Linda’s Vase,” “Admiring His Shadow” and “Horse Pull-Maine” are bathed in revealing shadow that forces the viewer to internalize what may or may not be visible and what is happening in the background. “Light and shadow is the basis of all my work,” Wise commented. “Fleeting light makes it more fascinating to me. Less than 30 seconds makes a difference in the progression of shadow.”

Sculptor Luc Fiedler, whose studio is in Mt. Airy/Union Bridge, originally worked in metal and iron manufacturing and now sculpts in primarily metal and wood and some stone. He is greatly influenced by astronomy and biology and refers to his “Entanglement,” a four-foot high wood sculpture with a metal dome base, as biomorphic. “It has the sense of being pulled away or pulled into,” Fielder said. The piece is made with wood from maple trees on his property that were hit by lightning and had to be cut down. He first uses a chainsaw, then smaller tools and filing and sanding to achieve form. Two of his smaller works are also shown—”Sight & Vision” in wood and stone cast bronze and “Railroad” combining wood and metal.

Photographer Howard Clark presents a panoramic view of a subterranean cavern in Gui Lin, China, in his “Subterranean City.” He used a wide-angle panoramic single image, getting down on his hands and knees without a tripod to capture the view. “I was in love with the cavern and its reflection,” he said, and was mesmerized by the fact that there is no visible light source in the cave. He explained how the light and colors draw the eye inside the image from both edges to the center of fiery light and reflection.

Image | Alexey Zoob Alexey Zoob exhibits his expressive and colorful work at the Arts Barn through Feb. 3, 2019.

Image | Alexey Zoob
Alexey Zoob exhibits his expressive and colorful work at the Arts Barn through Feb. 3, 2019.

Large-scale expressive and colorful works with thickly applied paint are Alexey Zoob’s specialty. He likes big, he likes details and he loves the texture of oil painting on linen. “February 2016” is a personal piece of a glimpse into life where he was born in the Russian Urals, a very old town where the temperature in February can be -34 below for several days in a row. “It was a time where I felt winter would never come to an end,” he said. “I hated it, but then I started to like it.” He began to paint “the warmth of the room, the books, tea, the kerosene lamp in case of a power outage and the fresh onion in a vase,” which is said to ward off colds if eaten raw. “It’s a whole story,” he revealed. “I had a very happy childhood. My parents were very free-thinking people.”

“White Heart Beating” is Montgomery Village artist Linda Slattery-Sherman’s expression of inner emotion—internal space, but with lots of movement. “I’m a person about movement,” Slattery-Sherman said. “I enjoy being involved in things.” Whites and lavenders give the expansive piece an ethereal misty feel. “I wanted to put out whatever is inside—an all over experience. I like the application process, the tactical quality. … I’m into how it feels, how it moves, the surface.”

Susan Delaney began working with glass 40 years ago, initially in stained glass, then fused and wax casting. “I love casting. I make original forms out of wax, encase them in plaster molds, melt the wax out and fill the cavity with molten glass,” she said. Her glass pieces, like the sage green wax-cast basket with leaves and a grapevine handle, show inventive design, quality technique and unusual brilliant color.

“Interior Spaces” is on display through Feb. 3, 2019 at the Arts Barn. Stop by Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m.

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