‘Today Will Be Different’ Written by Maria Semple

If you’re in the mood this winter for a book to snuggle up with that will transport you to a dreamy spot, look elsewhere! You’re not going to find it with Maria Semple’s newest novel “Today Will Be Different” (2016). The title refers to 40-something Eleanor Flood’s empowering morning chant, channeling her inner self to “be present,” “listen deeply” to others, “play a board game” with her son, “buy local” and “be (her) best self.” But hang on, because the day Eleanor takes us through is different and wildly so.

Eleanor is a busy, ambitious and quite neurotic TV writer and animator in Seattle who had plans for her day, but everything shifts when, her eight-year-old son Timby, who has feigned illness, gets out of his ultra-progressive school for the day to have some “mommy time.” Scattered in are other characters she runs into and some she wants to avoid running into. There’s a theft, an accident, bad news about the graphic memoir she’s been working on (several pages of which are included) and other things so whacky you may at first think you misread them.

The way Semple structures the book is disquieting though. The underlying bones of the book are the events on the day Eleanor and Timby spend together. Yet Semple slips in long sections, written in third person, about family members we have yet to meet. There’s the mother-and-father piece, the brother-in-law piece, the sister piece, and lastly the husband piece (which goes in a completely quirky direction). Some are more interesting than others, but occasionally, beginning reading a new chapter after a break, I wasn’t sure I’d picked up the right book. (Wait! Who’s Barnaby Fanning?)

That information should serve as an alert, not as a recommendation to pass on this book. But while I’m at it, I should also warn you that Eleanor can be extremely unlikeable. She’s brash, rude, judgmental, self-absorbed—I see a faint suggestion of a good heart from time to time—but these qualities might be attributed to the fact that she’s a totally stressed-out mother, wife, creative-type, and former New Yorker.

What has some people gushing over the book—The New York Times calls it one of the 100 Notable Books of 2016—is Semple’s razor-sharp observations, her ability to zoom in on the details of our lives today, and the brilliant gift of tweaking them up a notch or two to get laughs. This book has some of the funniest lines I’ve read in years, but political correctness is nowhere to be found. I can imagine a book club of frenzied, working mothers howling about their favorite lines, especially those when Timby reacts to Eleanor’s inappropriate behavior. A hint about the book’s genesis: Semple has said in interviews that about half of Timby’s lines to his mother are direct quotes of ones she’s heard from her daughter. No surprise that Semple can portray an on-the-edge mother so well.

It’s your choice now. How do you want to spend your day?

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