Local Artists Featured in FCAA Show

Photo | Linda Agar-Hendrix Linda Agar-Hendrix’s “Palouse Scene” captures the farm- ing area of eastern Washington state.

Photo | Linda Agar-Hendrix
Linda Agar-Hendrix’s “Palouse Scene” captures the farming area of eastern Washington state.

Frederick County Art Association (FCAA), the single largest group of active artists in the Frederick area, was out in force on the First Saturday of the new year to open their member show at the Delaplaine. The non-profit is committed to encouraging artistic growth within its membership and promoting community interest and participation in the visual arts.

Prior to the reception, an informal talk featuring four FCAA members introduced the gathering to examples of the art in the show. Collagist and photographer Becky Carpenter described her work as a building up of texture, photographic transfer and mixed media prints. “I love using color and texture,” she said. “It’s a great way to transfer your photography into other media.” Melinda Hala, Jen Ludke and Glenn Souders briefly discussed their work and approach to art. Three residents of the Urbana community—Linda Agar-Hendrix, Gary Carver and Ron Roos—are FCAA members who participated in the show.

Agar-Hendrix’s black-and-white photograph “Palouse Scene” depicts a farming area in eastern Washington state about an hour south of Spokane. “It is a huge wheat and legume-producing area. The crops in my photo are mostly wheat with windmills in the background,” she revealed. The Ijamsville artist exhibits and travels extensively, photographing unusual aspects of topography and landscapes.

Photo | Marylou Bono Gary Carver’s “Nuthatch Caper” features three nuthatches carved in mahogany on a piece of an old black locust fence post.

Photo | Marylou Bono
Gary Carver’s “Nuthatch Caper” features three nuthatches
carved in mahogany on a piece of an old black locust fence
post.

Ijamsville’s Gary Carver specializes in bird carvings using vintage and repurposed woods with the rare wood of the historic American chestnut tree in particular. His exhibited “Nuthatch Caper” shows three nuthatches carved in mahogany on a piece of an old black locust fence post. “The fence post was given to me by a farmer in Carroll County who came to a talk on American chestnuts that I gave at a workshop for the Baltimore Forestry Board. He thought the post may have been American chestnut wood. I suspected that it was black locust (which was proved after testing),” Carver explained.

Photo | Marylou Bono Ron Roos’ “Into the Blue” leverages glazes to produce a  cloud-like effect amongst the tree branches on the decora- tive bottle topped with a frosted glass globe stopper.

Photo | Marylou Bono
Ron Roos’ “Into the Blue” leverages glazes to produce a
cloud-like effect amongst the tree branches on the decorative bottle topped with a frosted glass globe stopper.

Urbana photographer and ceramicist Ron Roos showed two pieces of his distinctive stoneware with applied decals depicting historic Frederick County trees. “Into the Blue” features the use of glazes to produce a cloud-like effect amongst the tree branches on the decorative bottle topped with a frosted glass globe stopper. “The blue came about as I wanted to get more depth. I play with effects of mid-fire glazes stoneware.”

For more information on the Frederick County Art Association, visit www.fcaamd.org.

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