Vitality Fitness Guides Over-50 Crowd to Functional Fitness

Photo | Cara O’Connor Vitality Fitness and Wellness owner Aubrey Reinmiller and Vitality trainer Matt Miller prepare to lead a workout June 21 at the 422 Main St. studio, one followed by a special wine tasting at The Wine Harvest on Market Street. Another workout/wine tasting event is being planned for Aug. 23.

Photo | Cara O’Connor
Vitality Fitness and Wellness owner Aubrey Reinmiller and Vitality trainer Matt Miller prepare to lead a workout June 21 at the 422 Main St. studio, one followed by a special wine tasting at The Wine Harvest on Market Street. Another workout/wine tasting event is being planned for Aug. 23.


All of Aubrey Reinmiller’s beloved grandparents died way too soon—before or during their 60s. Those acute losses prompted the founder and owner of Kentlands’ Vitality Fitness and Wellness to make a pair of commitments to herself. “I wanted,” she said, “to stay alive and healthy for my family, and to help others do the same.”

As such, Reinmiller maintained a healthy lifestyle while growing up in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, then danced through her years at Moravian College. She earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology, briefly considering and rejecting counseling as a profession.

Two factors contributed to her switching professional gears. Not only did Reinmiller’s mother identify physical therapy as a good career choice for her active daughter, but also, she herself recognized the joy of “learning about anatomy and the human body and everything it is capable of” in the prerequisite physical therapy courses she took. After graduating and moving to Maryland, she returned to physical therapy by earning an associate of applied science degree at Anne Arundel Community College and passing the physical therapist assistant licensing exam.

From the start, Reinmiller worked with middle aged and older adults—in particular, those post-stroke or with balance issues, Parkinson’s disease or multiple sclerosis, as well as traditional orthopedic injuries. “I saw a need for expert personal training services to serve this crowd … a need for personal trainers with more education and experience who could safely and effectively progress these patients once their physical therapy benefits had run out or they had met their physical therapy goals but had more to work on to maintain or continue to improve for their daily function,” she said.

To fill the need she recognized, Reinmiller opened Vitality Fitness in 2014, “providing only in-home personal training for those post-rehab and older adults.” That quickly led to a second inspiration. “I realized I wanted to get into the prevention aspect of health as well to help women and men in their 50s, 60s and 70s do the things they need to do and enjoy the things they want to do. I wanted to make a difference in people’s lives and help them to make healthy changes earlier in their lives,” she explained. Thus, in addition to personal training, Reinmiller began offering in-studio small group and one-on-one personal training.

The “functional fitness approach,” said Reinmiller, “allows our clients to see an improvement in their daily lives. Our exercises mimic and carry over to provide them with more function. Our clients are able to garden, carry dog food, lift their grandchildren, travel in Europe and other vacations with ease.”

While “we do perform the standard exercises such as bicep curls at times,” she added, “most times, they are in combination with another activity or exercise as our muscles don’t work solo during our day very often.”

Vitality Fitness serves a specific market. “The great thing about working with the over-50 crowd is they understand the importance of exercise and are willing to do the work,” Reinmiller observed. “Their reasons for why they exercise are life changing! We are helping our clients get off their blood pressure medications, reduce their risk of life-threatening conditions and improve their balance, strength and endurance to get back to hobbies, travel and activities they truly enjoy.”

Vitality’s small-group training consists of “dynamic workouts that don’t incorporate stationary machines, so we can work endurance, strength and balance in a 45-minute workout,” Reinmiller said. The groups have no more than six people to make sure everyone gets “personal attention from our personal trainer to guide form, ensure safety and personalize the program for (each individual’s) goals and needs.”

Vitality’s six certified personal trainers, Reinmiller said, “are experienced in working with our population … and design the sessions with each member in mind. We have an outline of the important types of motions that need to occur, but each session is different and tailored to the needs of the members attending that session.” That outline is delineated in her paperback, “Reinvent Aging: The Over 50 Fitness Guide to Improve Energy, Strength, and Balance” (2017).

Reinmiller once did all the personal training sessions herself. Now that Vitality has two locations—in Rockville and the Kentlands—and she has moved with her family back to Pennsylvania and comes to town a couple of times a week, she focuses on managing and marketing the business. Now, she said, “I get to share my passion by training and leading our team.”

The Kentlands studio, opened “almost overnight” in November, has worked out well. “We have worked with a lot of local businesses and enjoy the community very much. There are a number of fitness programs in the Kentlands, but our studio specializes in working with those over 50, which is pretty unique.”

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